Kyle Hunker

Cider makers will pick your fruit trees clean

Group aims to keep apples on West Shore and across region from rotting on the ground

Rob Reynolds isn’t above stopping the car and knocking on a stranger’s door for a tree laden with apples.

“We find trees all over the city. There are a lot in Oak Bay. There’s a lot of what used to be orchards,” said Reynolds, who grew up in and still works in the municipality.

He’s part of the Greater Victoria Cider Enthusiasts Association, which boasts a Facebook membership of more than 90, that scours the south Island in search of apples that would otherwise go to waste.

The enthusiasts formed three years ago, after meeting each other through the local home brewing community. A group from BrewVic sought to explore beyond beer into ciders and wines. Also, a contingent of ex-pat Brits were desperate to find a dry, less sweet cider than the staple readily available.

“I fell in love with cider when I lived in the West Country in the U.K.,” said Kalynka Cherkosh of Esquimalt.

Here, she found, she couldn’t afford the good stuff on a regular basis and decided to take control of the situation.

“I wanted to make a nice meaty, drier farmhouse cider,” she said. Cherkosh made a few hundred litres that year and held a wassail in late winter to celebrate – a tradition they continue three years in. “It just seems every year we’ve organized a bit more,” she added.

Now they hand out the leaflets and seek out abandoned trees. A common theme for the older generation is a hatred of waste. Where an older homeowner used to pick and preserve each fall, they simply don’t have the ability anymore and want to see it put to use. They’ll pick the apples, or in some cases pears, and leave as much as the household can utilize, Reynolds said.

“We’re trying to turn fallen fruit into caught fruit,” Cherkosh said.

“There’s so much fruit in this city that just falls to the ground,” she said, adding she’d far rather do the work to capture, process and enjoy the fruits of that labour, than see it rotting on the ground, attracting deer and wasps.

Then the Cider Enthusiasts benefit with good local product as opposed to being stuck using ready-made juice for their cider making.

“It’s the difference between Wonder Bread and a beautiful loaf of bread from Fol Epi,” Cherkosh said. “Sometimes I want a fluffy white bread, but not every day.”

To offer apples for the Greater Victoria Cider Enthusiasts Association email gruitmama@gmail.com.

editor@goldstreamgazette.com

Just Posted

Prize winning Urban Bee Honey Farm generating a buzz

Urban Bee honoured at the Vancouver Island Business Awards

African rhythms, dance performance to help out Sierra Leone charity group

Feb. 23 show by Issamba ensemble a fundraiser for Victoria-Taiama Partnership

Excitement builds for first Victoria Folk ‘N Fiddle Festival in Sidney

First headliners announced, wide range of community friendly musical, cultural events planned

Over 100 take the Vancouver Island polar plunge

More than $25,000 raised for BC Special Olympics athletes

B.C. students win Great Waters Challenge video contest

Video, mural and song about saving the salmon claims the top prize

B.C. athlete takes home gold in freestyle aerials at Canada Games

Brayden Kuroda won the event with a combined score of 121.65.

Cabinet likely to extend deadline to reconsider Trans Mountain pipeline

New round of consultations with Indigenous communities is coming

B.C. government provides $75,000 towards salmon study

Study looks at abundance and health of Pacific salmon in Gulf of Alaska

UBC researchers develop inexpensive tool to test drinking water

The tricoder can test for biological contamination in real-time

Disgraced ex-Congressman Anthony Weiner released from prison

He was convicted of having illicit online contact with a 15-year-old North Carolina girl in 2017

B.C. communities push back against climate change damages campaign

Activists copying California case that was tossed out of court

Most Read