Camosun digital communication instructor Andy Bryce examines a photograph of his great grandfather

Ancestor’s courageous legacy inspires documentary film

Royal Roads University student's research led him on a journey of discovery

Ivan Watson / Black Press

It was an inherited box of genealogical files that first notified Camosun College instructor Andy Bryce about the work of his great grandfather, Dr. Peter Bryce.

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission review was three years into its research when Andy discovered the box in 2011, following his mom’s passing. He was fascinated to discover that his ancestor, Dr. Bryce, was one of the few senior Canadian officials at the time to take a courageous stand against the abuses suffered by aboriginal children at the church-run and government-sanctioned residential schools.

“A light just went off for me,” he said. In five years since his discovery, Andy has dedicated much research to the subject, and is in production of a short film documentary about Dr. Bryce’s story for middle school students across Canada.

“Growing up I didn’t know much about him,” Andy said. “After sorting through the box, I looked him up on the Canadian Encyclopedia, and the first thing mentioned was his role revealing health abuses in residential schools. In 1907, Dr. Bryce, then chief medical officer in the federal Indian Affairs department, reported that one in four children in Western Canadian residential schools died from tuberculosis over a three-year period. At one school, the rate was as high as seven in 10.

After bringing attention to the appalling rates of neglect and suffering, Dr. Bryce was shuffled to another department and his previous position was eliminated.

But he never gave up. After he retired in 1921, Dr. Bryce criticized the government’s inaction in a book, The Story of a National Crime. Despite stirring a national scandal, the government did nothing at the time.

Sitting in his office at Camosun’s Lansdowne campus, great grandson Andy is visibly proud of Dr. Bryce’s courage.

“One of the things that struck me was how tenacious he was about this particular issue and how long he stuck with it. It obviously got under his skin,” Andy said.

At the time, the research fit perfectly as the starting point for Andy’s thesis as he was studying a master’s of professional communication at Royal Roads University.

“My great grandfather’s story was the cornerstone for my research,” he said. Andy attended a family reunion in Ontario, where he met many of Dr. Bryce’s descendants for the first time. Following that he contacted Peter Campbell, a filmmaker he knew with 30 years of experience working on social justice issues. Using Andy’s research, they partnered to produce a documentary film.

The timing couldn’t have been better.

In March 2015, the University of Toronto opened a school of indigenous public health, named in part after Dr. Bryce.

The documentary attracted the attention of Charlene Bearhead at the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation, who proposed that Andy and Campbell produce a 20-minute version of their documentary for middle school students across Canada. Andy anticipates the short film will be ready later this spring. The full-length documentary is still in progress.

“I think his most important legacy is to contradict the idea of laissez-faire government, and to say that government should be involved in the way that society is run, to ensure social justice.”

Bryce aims to finish the longer documentary in time to coincide with Canada’s 150th anniversary celebrations in 2017. For more information visit facebook.com/PeterHBryce.

editor@goldstreamgazette.com

Just Posted

Governing bodies accused of ‘destroying’ girls’ hockey by Island’s top team

When asked for advice hockey dad says ‘put your girls in soccer’

Guns could use smartphone-style fingerprint locks in near future

Startups looking to outflank traditional gun manufacturers using tech knowhow

Syrian violinist plays with new Canadian band at upcoming fundraiser

Sari Alesh played with the Symphony Orchestra in Syria for six years

Esquimalt to finalize township’s four-year plan

Council will soon make final decisions on its draft strategic goals and priorities

Sarah Beckett Cruise back for its fourth year this Sunday

Money this year is going into buying playground equipment for the playground in honour of the fallen constable

WATCH: Movie star and PACE alum Calum Worthy talks musical theatre and his career

“American Vandal” and “Austin and Ally” actor has been returning to the program for over 20 years

POLL: How often does your family use BC Ferries?

Navigating the lineups for BC Ferries is a way of life for… Continue reading

Crime Stoppers most wanted for Greater Victoria for the week of April 16

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

Flooding, climate change force Quebecers to rethink relationship with water

Compensation for victims of recurring floods limit to 50% of a home’s value, or a maximum of $100,000

Storms blast South, where tornadoes threaten several states

9.7 million people in the Carolinas and Virginia at a moderate risk of severe weather

Private cargo ship brings Easter feast to the space station

There are three Americans two Russians and one Canadian living on the space station

Notre Dame rector: “Computer glitch” possible fire culprit

The fire burned through the lattice of oak beams supporting the monument’s vaulted stone ceiling

B.C. senior sentenced for sexually abusing special-needs granddaughter

73-year-old Cortes Island man will go to jail for three years

Howe Sound Queen sailing toward retirement

Vessel now up for auction ends regular runs between Crofton and Vesuvius at the beginning of June

Most Read