Children need to be taught to speak out against bullying

There will always be bullies but we need to teach our children how not give them power by being victims and bystanders.

I read with interest the responses to the article on bullying (“Bullying experience harsh reminder,” June 1). Verbal bullying has always existed. It is built into our society and glorified on TV and in movies where everyone laughs at the person slipping on the banana peal instead of helping him.

Whether verbal bullying continues to have power depends on whether we choose to teach our children to be victims or instead to own and control their feelings and beliefs about themselves. Ultimately nobody has power over your feelings unless you give it to them. They can hand you the verbal knife but you can choose not to stab yourself with it.

In her book, Barbara Coloroso explains that we need to teach our children not to be bystanders. If even one bystander speaks out, the power shifts away from the bully.

There will always be bullies but we need to teach our children how not give them power by being victims and bystanders.

Lara Allsopp

Victoria