Stop means stop at new signs in Colwood

Colwood bylaw officer set to hand out tickets enforcing the law at new stop signs

Colwood bylaw enforcement manager Kevin Atkinson is warning drivers that his officers will now be handing out tickets to those who fail to stop at a new set of stop signs at Lagoon Road and Ocean Boulevard.

A new set of stop signs is causing some confusion at the intersection of Lagoon Road and Ocean Boulevard, and Colwood bylaw officers are handing out tickets to those who fail to obey.

The signs were installed mid-December and turn the intersection from a through road with a side street emptying onto it, into a full three-way stop. Along with the stop signs a crosswalk was installed, and painted stop bars on all three sides of the intersection. The stop signs are fitted with bright “new” signs underneath them, and signs ahead of them to warn drivers of the change.

Bylaw officers have been regularly monitoring the intersection since its installation and handed out warnings to those who fail to stop, but the grace period is over. As of Monday, Jan. 21 the ticket books are out.

Since mid-December bylaw enforcement manager Kevin Atkinson said about 150 drivers were given warnings for not stopping, and that doesn’t include those who merely slowed down for the signs without fully stopping, known as a “California stop.”

“People are not stopping, they’re going right through them. They’re completely disregarding the stop signs,” Atkinson said. “It’s so well marked out that it’s there, but people are focused. They’ve driven that road for years and they’ve never seen anything there before and they’re completely surprised.

“Stop means stop.”

The ticket for failing to stop will cost drivers $75, if issued by a bylaw enforcement officer. If an RCMP officer issues a ticket it will cost the driver a considerable amount more and include points on their driver’s licence.

Bylaw officers will also be setting up a video camera to capture evidence if anyone disputes whether they stopped or not.

 

“If they wish to dispute that evidence they can do so in court and that video evidence will be shown in court,” Atkinson said. “Then they can explain to the judge why they failed to stop.”