News

Spencer school scraps for travel

Roman Hamilton-Kapan, left, Matthew Dupont and Ian Sentries pick through some of the cooler items left in the metal recycling bin outside Spencer middle school. The three plan to participate in the spring school trip. - Christine van Reeuwyk/News staff
Roman Hamilton-Kapan, left, Matthew Dupont and Ian Sentries pick through some of the cooler items left in the metal recycling bin outside Spencer middle school. The three plan to participate in the spring school trip.
— image credit: Christine van Reeuwyk/News staff

Displays of Egypt, China, Europe and Japan take on a personal feel at Spencer middle school. Snapshots show students and former students in the midst of the temples and tombs.

The Langford school has a long history of organizing globe-trotting tours to provide students with a better understanding of the world, seeing differing cultures first-hand.

“It’s such a good opportunity for students to experience different cultures,” explained Yvonne Clarke, a behaviour support teacher at Spencer. She’s also one of the trip organizers. “It’s the only way to understand what other people’s lives are like.”

“The kids, once they experience new cultures ... it brings them back thinking differently and appreciating what they have here,” said teacher librarian Christine Dosouto, who creates hard-cover memoir books for the school library. “You just come back more mature.”

The kids, who range from Grade 6 to 12 at Spencer and Belmont, are responsible for their own passports, money and keeping track of their own belongings.

“They really have to become more independent,” Clarke said.

“Some kids get the travelling bug,” added Dosouto.

That’s true for Spencer student Ian Sentries who learned a little about Asia hanging with his cousins during the Japan trip earlier this year. He plans to “gain more experience on other cultures” on the Peru trip.

“I want to see the world,” he said.

With the nine-day trip to Peru in spring 2013 looking to break the bank, they turned to fundraisers for the first time.

“We felt we really needed to do something to help parents to bring down the cost,” said Clarke.

All metals are accepted, from frying pans to kitchen stoves. Refrigerators and items containing mercury and asbestos are not accepted.

 

Drop off metal recyclables anytime at the bin outside Spencer middle school, 1026 Goldstream Ave. until Nov. 26.

 

 

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