5 ways to change your life for the better

Have your New Year’s resolutions already fallen to the wayside? If so, don’t fret or feel discouraged — you’re in good company.

Sponsored by Bridges for Women

Have your New Year’s resolutions already fallen to the wayside? If so, don’t fret or feel discouraged — you’re in good company.

According to a recent Ipsos poll, only three in 10 Canadians will set a New Year’s resolution, and of those, 73 per cent eventually break them.

Rather than focus on making sweeping character changes, February is a great time to reflect on the past year’s behaviour move towards making positive lifestyle changes that are likely to stick and propel you forward into a bright future.

Here are five no-fail strategies to change your life for the better:

  1. Ground yourself in the present moment. Find an object that you can carry with you as a physical reminder to come back to the present moment. It could be a ring, bracelet, rock or shell that you can feel, see and hold. Remind yourself everyday to breathe; focus on your feet touching the ground. Look around you and notice your surroundings: what colours you see, sounds you hear and textures you feel.
  2. Set boundaries. Fortunately, setting healthy boundaries is a learned skill. It takes practice, but over time, setting healthy boundaries increases your health, safety and success at school and work. Inadvertently, modeling boundaries to your children also increases their health and safety. Boundary setting workshops are held in most communities, and are a good way to meet and make new friends and allies. Another option is to go to your local library and take out a book on boundary setting or to research healthy boundaries online.
  3. Rest, rest. Developing a rest and sleep routine helps calm your nervous system. You can also look at the practice of rest and sleep as caring for your inner child who needs your protection and soothing to fall asleep.
  4. Exercise and movement. Movement enables the body to filter toxins, circulate oxygen and nutrients throughout our system and it enhances our mood. Walking is a low-impact exercise that has many stress reduction and health benefits. Start small, and move your body — it doesn’t have to be complicated. For example, a student from Bridges for Women Society says she kept fit by dancing to three songs a day. Remember, self-care doesn’t have to cost a lot, and it is important for rebuilding energy and strengthening resilience.
  5. Overcome fears of conflict. Conflict is a part of life and the more tools you have to deal with it, the better. Read about and participate in conflict resolution workshops and practice the techniques that you learn. Be open to self-awareness, and be open to appropriate feedback on your behaviour — remember, this can be a learning opportunity.

The Bridges for Women Society, serving the communities of southern Vancouver Island the south Gulf Islands, has been helping women change their life for years.

This non-profit organization aims to help women from all walks of life to enter the workforce as financially independent, self-sufficient members of the labour market, free from the impacts of trauma and abuse that previously held them back.

For more information about Bridges for Women Society, visit www.bridgesforwomen.ca.

 

 

 

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