Maarten Schaddelee hosts spring show

A selection of the new work is created from ancient materials including marble and 800 year old cedar.

Maarten Schaddelee’s Wings of Light

Maarten Schaddelee will be showcasing new work and a new direction for his work in the annual Maarten Schaddelee Spring Fine Art Show May 5 and 6.

A selection of the new work is created from ancient materials including marble and 800 year old cedar. Many of the pieces express the spirit of the wildlife that lives on the land and in the ocean near the Maarnada studio, says Schaddelee.

“We’re surrounded by eagles right now. They are flying overhead, spending time in our yard and exploring the beach,” he says. “In sculpting them I’ve been stretching them out to emphasize their movement and grace. They don’t look like eagles in photographs; it’s more an expression of their spirit in flight.”

Schaddelee’s signature whale tails have also evolved, stretching to emphasize grace and movement. Recently, his whale tails have been created from 800 year old red cedar blocks that were originally destined to be cedar shakes.

An alabaster bowl is carved into delicate eagle wings that allow light to come through in much the same way light is visible through eagle feathers.

Schaddelee has created pieces from stone he refers to as Dutch Bakery marble, a slab of Italian marble that was a table top in the Dutch Bakery on Fort Street where he worked for 28 years.

“I learned to work with my hands on that marble table,” Schaddelee says. “When the table cracked and couldn’t be used as a table anymore they gave it to me so the beautiful stone could continue to evolve. You could say we’ve both gone through a transformation.”

The public is invited to Maarnada studios, gallery and sculpture garden, 4635 Vantreight Drive, May 5 and 6 between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Schaddelee will be in attendance both days.